Jottings By An Employer's Lawyer

Thursday, February 05, 2009

Because It's Where the Money Is


Although it has never been my intent for this to be a politically focused blog, if you are a relatively new reader, you might not know that. While I certainly don't intend to ignore the rest of the labor and employment world, the fact is that much of what could be most important for employers in the long term is going to be happening in Washington during this session of Congress.

I feel basically like Willie Sutton who famously responded to a question by the FBI as to why he robbed banks by saying "because that's where the money is." For the foreseeable future, if you are focusing on the world of labor and employment law, Washington D.C. is where the money is.

If you share that feeling you should check out a seminar sponsored by a number of large trade associations and my firm, Ogletree Deakins, The New Administration and New Congress: Guaranteed Changes for Labor and Employment Law which will be held in DC on February 26-27. You can check out the agenda and the impressive list of speakers, including elected officials and Congressional staffers here. The trade groups co-sponsoring the seminar are:
U.S. Chamber of Commerce
The Business Roundtable
National Association of Manufacturers
National Federation of Independent Business
Associated General Contractors of America
American Hotel and Lodging Association
American Bakers Association
National Association of Waterfront Employers
National Roofing Contractors Association
Associated Builders and Contractors
Retail Industry Leaders Association
International Franchise Association
National Retail Federation
National Council of Chain Restaurants
Utility Line Clearance Coalition
Food Marketing Institute
Printing Industries of America
I am on a panel at the end of the first day, so if you should join us be sure to come by and introduce yourself.


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